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Notes

Genealogy Beginnings

Genealogy Beginnings





[NI033] He served in the U.S. Navy during the Spanish American War. He was a steamfitter by trade.
Buried in Forest Lawn Cemetry in Buffalo, NY in Spanish War Veterans Lot.
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[NI034] Buried in the Brookdale Cemetary of Dedham in lot #1650.
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[NI037] Ruth Ackerman was educated in Buffalo, New York and was a graduate of Riverside High, class of 1940. She did secretarial work for Colonial Radio (now Sylvania) before moving to Dedham, MA in the summer of 1944. She was employed by the Herald-Traveler newspaper until her marriage in 1948.
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[NI056] He attended Dedham schools and was graduated from the 4 year plumbing course at Boston Trade in June, 1931. he served in the army during World War II and was honorably discharged in November 1945. For over 30 years, he was employed by the Cundy-Bettoney Company of Hyde Park, MA, makers of woodwind musical instruments, until that company went out of business. he then worked for Allen-Doan, Inc., a small, but diversified, company dealing mainly in seal presses and silk-screen work. After moving to Tampa Florida in July 1970 with his wife and daughter, he was employed by St. Joseph's hospital in the Medical equipment maintenance department.
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[NI076] Married July 14, 1934 in Woodsville, NH. Divorced January 2, 1936. No Children. Unknown Spouse.

Second Marriage August 20, 1938 in Merrimack, NH. Unknown Spouse.
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[NI084] Raytheon Employee, then Honeywell Co. 1972 teacher at St. Thomas Episcopal School in Houston Texas.
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[NI100] He was a stone mason (building houses and chimneys) but after an accident (staging collapsing) was unable to continue his trade and became a weaver in a silk mill. He became a naturalized citizen of the United States on April 1, 1932. He was cremated and his ashes placed in the Columbarium of the Forest Hills Cemetary in Boston, MA.
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[NI101] She immigrated to Dedham, MA with her husband and became a naturalized citizen of the United States on April 1, 1932. She was cremated and accoding to her wishes, her ashes were placed with those of her husband in the Columbarium of the Forest Hills Cemetary, Boston, MA. Nich #5, Tier D, South Wall of the Chapel of Peace.
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[NI102] Was a Tenant Farmer.
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[NI104] Was a ranger or warden in the forest for the local (state) government. Watching for fires, practicing conservation and reporting poachers.
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[NI115] His home known as the "Fuller Place" was in West Acton on the Stow Road.
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[NI116] The History of Middlesex County, under Acton, says (p. 271) "Alden Fuller Place. Nathaniel Faulkner in the olden time lived there; he owned the place; he had several sons, Nathaniel kept the home-place and lived there during his life. His daughter Sarah married Alden Fuller. He bought the home-place and lived there during his life. (p. 273) situated on Farr's road to Meeting in 1735 coming from Stow.
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[NI117] Baptised June 6, 1825. First Congregational Church
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[NI118] Intention May 13, 1849
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[NI119] Baptized January 3, 1827. First Congregational Church
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[NI120] Baptized September 14, 1828
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[NI121] Baptized December 10, 1829. First Congregational Church
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[NI124] Baptized June 16, 1833. Evangelical Congregational Church
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[NI125] Baptized September 18, 1834. Evangelical Congregational Church
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[NI133] Littleton Vital Records has the marriage date August 11, 1792. Betsey Wheeler of Littleton; Lancaster record has Ebenezer born in Boxboro and Betsey born in Halifax, Nova Scotia.
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[NI161] Could possibly be Bond's, Watertown has Susan Chinery
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[NI169] He was one of the first settlers of Cambridge Village, now Newton about 1644, but he came to New England about 1635. In December 1658 he bought 750 acres of land for about $1.00 per acre in a bend of the Charles River with the river on the north and west. Later, he increased his holdings to upwards of 1,000 acres and became one of the two largest land-holders in the village--known as "Fuller's Farm." He divided his land among his children in his life-time an dconfirmed the gifts by his will with the proviso that they should not sell to any stranger, until they, or their next relatin, should have the offer of it. He is called "Farmer" and "Maltster."
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[NI179] Samuel Hyde and John Fuller provided for job's children and in the division of the estate in march 1694/95, Samuel took the land given to him by his father and paid his brothers and sisters 64 li.
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[NI193] He was, probably, the Lieut. Nathaniel Faulkner in Capt. Simon Hunt's (Acton) Co. Col. Eleazer Brook's regt. served 6 days when the company was called out at the fortifying of Dorchester heights, March 4, 1776.
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[NI194] Baptized July 9, 1775 in Cambridge, MA
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[NI201] In a list of carpenters in Co. Nicholas' regt. in the Canada Expedition of 1758 is Nathaniel Faulkner; this regt. is supposed to have started from andover. (N.E.H.G.SOC. Register, Vol. 10, p. 310)

In the Federal Census of 1790 is the family of Nathaniel Faulkner living at Acton with 3 sons under 16 and 3 daughters ages not given.

(No record of this birth, but his age fits him in here).
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[NI203] Baptized September 24, 1760
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[NI211] Baptized September 11, 1785
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[NI218] Buried in same lot with James.
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[NI219] He served as selectman for five years. His will dated in 1728 gives Nehemia the homestead and land after the death of his wife.
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[NI245] Buried at Watertwon Burying Ground, west of Watertown, MA. He inherited family home at Watertown, to which he made 'new' additions to the older portion that his son Samuel occupied. Photos have been taken of the home, the neighboring Abraham Brown School, and the gravesites of Abraham, Lydia, and a number of their descendants. Held numerous town positions, including that of Town Treasurer, Assessor, Selectman, Town Clerk, and Captain of Militia. he was licensed as an innkeeper in 1709, an dcontinued as such for 4 years. Appointed guardian in 1708 of the 17 year old Ephraim Williams, later Col. and father of the founder of Williams College.
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[NI251] He embarked on the ship "Jonathan" at Lond for Boston in april 1639 and became the second settler at Cambridge village about 1640. In 1647 with his brother Jonathan, he bought 40 acres of land; in 1652, 200 acres more; they held this land in common until 1661 when a division was made. he was one of the proprietors of Billerica Lands and had 80 acres there in the dision of 1652. His descendants owned part of the property in Newton. A George Hyde was living on part of the homestead in 1854. his wife, Temperance, probably came with him from England. His will was dated in 1689 and states that he owned a farm in Watertown of 124 acres; provides a comfortable maintenance for his widow and makes her sole executor with brother jonathan as overseer. His grandson, Samuel is to have the homestead and to manage and improve it for the benefit for Temperance and after her death the Watertown fram is to be divided between three of his son Job's children, Samuel, John and Sarah; confirms what he has given his son Samuel and his son in law Thomas Woolson. His son Samuel's house was burnt May 21, 1709 and with the assistance of his neighbors, it was raised again in 14 days.
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[NI260] James Balston was a shp carpenter and he had a brother Jonathan who was prominent as a shp builder. On June 28, 1660, James and his wife Sarah deeded to Mordecai Nichols certain land which James had purchased of his brother Jonathan. james also seems to have had some land at Muddy River (now Brookline). His will dated December 13, 1681 states that he was sick and weak of body, was of Boston, mentions wife Sarah who was named executrix, three sons, John, James, Jonathan, three daughters, Sarah, Abigail and Mary, each to receive 3 pounds but the moveables to be divided between the two youngest; signed with his autograph; the inventory mentions 2 silver cups, 2 silver spoons; muskit, pistolle and sword and land at 120 pounds. The total being 167 li 8s. He was appointed Hogreeve in 1673/74 and 1674; scavenger 1674/75; took oath of allegiance November 11, 1678; He was taxed in 1681.

N. B. There was a "William Balston (Baulstone) in Boston, who had children baptized Pittie (dau.) October 1630; William april 15, 1633; Mary September 1634, Mehetabel January 24, 1635, Meribah April 9, 1637. No indication of relationship with James and Jonathan.

Also, Lydia Balston, widow, died April 25, 1664 and as Jonathan had a daughter named Lydia, it is just possible that she may have been the mother of James and Jonathan.
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[NI261] October 19, 1649, The General Court granted a petition of Ralph Roote and Sarah, his daughter, for liberty to confirm a bargaine and sale of a house and land in Reading, given to the said Sarah, being under age, to Thomas taylor of Watertown to whom they sold the same. this property had been settled upon her (Sarah) by Edward Whitfield, in Reading (Mass. Colonial Records, vol. 2, p. 283). Is this a clue to the name of Sarah's mother?
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[NI267] Baptized August 10, 1673
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[NI269] The earliest record, so far found, of him is under date of October 17, 1649 when he and his daughter, Sarah, were granted liberty to confirm the sale to Thomas Taylor of land in Reading. (see notes under Sarah). Ten years later, he sold land in Boston to Scottow and James Balston witnessed the deed, under date of February 28, 1659; on March 4, 1659 he deeded to James Balston and Sarah, his wife, a swelling house, land Orchard and garden, on condition that the said James and Sarah or their executors "shall maintaine ye said Ralph Roote with necessary meate drink and apparrell in sickness and in health, he being ye natural father of ye said Sarah, he being stricken in age and decrepid" he signed with his mark, a large T. "This deede being read unto Ralph Roote, he did acknowledge it to be his deed, May 10, 1660; it was recorded March 28, 1666. This indicates that he could neither read nor write, (common enought among our early settlers) and proves that he was the father of Sarah, the wife of James Balston.

His will, "nuncupative" or dictated, speaks of sona nd daughter Balston "with whom he lived" who were to have all that was his excepting 10 s to his daughter Jeane Buttell and 5s to his daughter at Lynn; administration on the estate was granted to James Balston March 29, 1666; inventory was taken March 29, 1666 and was as follows:

1 acre salt marsh at Muddy River 8 li
1 Cow 3 li 10
1 sucking calfe 10
money 1 8
wearing apparell 2 8
1 flock bed 1 flock bolster 1 8
1 straw bed 2 small pillows 9
bed blanketts one (?) Rugge 1 10
half headed bedstead 9
1 small chest 3
3 old sheetes 6 wearing Lining 14 1
3 chaires 3 6
1 iron pott and trammill and tongues 8
1 brass skillett 1 kettle 4 6
1 small table and woddinne dishes 4 6
3 small tubbs 4
____________________

21 19 6

The land he gave to James and Sarah covered what is now Park Square.

Jacob Ellit age 33 being sent for to Ralph Rootes before his death in February last deposed concerning his will, the deposition being dated March 29, 1666 which shows that his death was probably on march 10 instead of May 10. the inventory being taken also on March 27, would suggest the same and was sworn to on that date by Jacob Elliot and Theophilus Frayre; James Balston deposted as to the estate of his Father in law Ralph Roote.

Hotten's Lists of emigrants gives amont those who came over to New England in the "Abigail" embarking June 17th 1635, described as "no subsidy men" "who had taken the oath of allegiance, Ralph Wallis age 40 and Ralph Roote age 50, and in another list is found "Mary Roote age 15, certified by ministers of Stephney Parish" who is supposed to have been a daughter of Ralph. Why his wife does not appear is not known, but a record of the first church, Boston, reads (see Drake's Memorial History of Boston, vol. 1, p. 572) "Mary ye wife of Ralph Roote 3d 12th month 1638," refering to there admission as a memeber of the church (not ann, but Mary, sometimes quoted as Ann). A Boston record has under date of November 15, 1655, Mary, wife of Ralph Rooted, died.
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[NI271] Baptized November 18, 1627 at Maresfield.
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[NI272] Baptized June 13, 1630 at Maresfield.
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[NI276] He was a tanner by trade and tradition says he removed to New York, perhaps New York State, where he probably died. The compiler of the Cox Genealogy says that there are several transactions not altogether indicative of thrift recorded in the Middlesex Deeds from 1783 to 1786 and Mrs. Judith Cox with her sons William and Upham were in straightened circumstances in Charlestown on March 6, 1807. The records of the First Parish of Lexington, have July 9, 1775, Susanna Cox of Walter Cox, who had owned the covenant at Cambridge, baptized. The compiler adds, "the summer of 1775, was very warm in this section and the family probably was sent to Lexington fro safety.

Walter Cox was a private in Maj. Nathaniel Heath's company, November 14, 1779 -- February 13, 1780, service three months; also same company, February 14, 1780--May 1, 1780, w months 18 days; also same company, May 1, -- August 4, 3 months 4 days; same company, August 7--October8, 1780, 2 months, services performed with guards at Boston under successive engagements of 3 months.
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[NI277] baptized April 15, 1750
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[NI278] Baptized January 18, 1770
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[NI279] Baptized June 6, 1773
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[NI284] He was admitted a member of the Old First Church, Cambridge MA on December 30, 1739 and his wife on April 17, 1742. A deed of 1746 mentions lan din boston "part of my honored father Robert's estage, with Elias and andrew Cox as co-heirs. His widow died prior to February 1768 and Walter and Samuel were administrators. Of the Six boys who l ived to mature years, five have Revolutionary records. His home was a cottage on what is now the west side of Massachusetts Avenue, a little north of the railroad Station at North Cambridge.
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[NI286] Baptized January 20, 1739/40
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[NI287] baptized March 1, 1740/41
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[NI288] Baptized December 19, 1742
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[NI291] Baptized September 23, 1746
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[NI292] Baptized ____ 27, 1748
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[NI293] Baptized April 8, 1750
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[NI294] Baptized 1752
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[NI295] Baptized April 14, 1754
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[NI298] He is supposed to have been the same man as Robert Cox of Marblehead, who was a member of the military company from Marblehead and Salem under Capt. Gardiner in the Swamp Fight in King Phillip's War. an inventory of the estate of William Pease of Salem dated April 28, 1678, mentions 7 bbls of mackeral shipped to Barbadoes by Robert Cox; the name of his first wife has not been discovered. He appeared in Scituate aobut 1690, but after his marriage he removed to Boston, where he was engaged in the business of a fisherman. he lived on Prince Street.

A Cambridge item in the Boston News Letter dated February 19, 1756 reads: "Yesterday, toward the setting sun, Mr. Matthew Cox of this town, fell from an apple tree that he was pruning and breaking his nex died instantly whose sudden death is very much lamented having left a sorrowful widow and eight young hcildren and she is in daily expectation onf increasing the number of the fatherless."
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[NI317] He was a victualler by occupation and lived in Malden and Charlestown; his residence in Charlestown seems to have been on the Medford Road. The inventory of his estate is dated March 10, and his widow was granted administration on the estate May 10, 1777; his daughter, Judith had 3/4 of an acre and 18 rods out of $255,000 of his estate. He was taxed in Charlestown from 1744 to 1777.

A journal kept in Boston Gael in 1775 has a list of prisoners taken at the Battle of Bunker Hill, containing 31 names, and shows that 20 of the prisoners died, 1 was dismissed and 10 were alive, and among the 10 was John Deland of Charlestown. In the Settlement of the estate in addition to Judith's share, David received 3/4 acre and 15 rods, Mary 1/2 acre and 10 rods, Elizabeth 1/2 acre and 12 rods, Susanna 1/2 acre and 24 rods, John 1 1/4 acres and 24 rods northeast on the Medford road, 2 1/4 acres and 20 rods to the widow. Judith, widow, gave quit claim to ltos he bought of John and the heirs, John, Mary, Elizabeth and Judith sold to William Stearns 2 1/2 acres of marsh in 1788.

His widow received "collection money" in 1786 to pay for damage done in the Revolutionary War.
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[NI320] Baptized April 3, 1739
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[NI322] Baptized March 29, 1747
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[NI324] Baptized march 17, 1754
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[NI325] Baptized August 29, 1756
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[NI326] Baptized August 27, 1758
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[NI327] Baptized February 28, 1762. Enlisted, Corporal 1779
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[NI328] Baptized October 2, 1763
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[NI330] His occupation was that of a Shoemaker, or dealer in leather, "Cordwainer."
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[NI332] He was a minister at West Springfield.
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[NI344] By his father's will, he was to receive the new dwelling house with the land belonging to it, also the meadow and half of the stock, when he should come of age of 21. He was selectman 1692-1696, 1704--1704, 1709--1710, 1717; moderator of Town Meeting 1711, 1714, 1715, 1717; town treasurer 1697-1701; representative at the General Court settlement of estates. His grave stone is still standing:

HERE LYES YE BODY OF DEACON PHINEAS UPHAM
DIED Oct. 1720 In Ye 62 Year OF HIS AGE.

His wife survived him, but there seems to be no record of her death.
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[NI356] He purchased land in Malden in 1663, 1664, 1668 and was appointed to appraise land in 1688. In 1673, he was on a committee to survey a road from Cambridge to malden; in 1674 he twice served as appraiser of estates, was on a committee to alter a highway and also signed a petition in regard to land in Worcester which place he was interested in settling. He served as Lieutenant in King Philip's War, was wounded at the Swamp Fight December 19, 1675, and never recovered from the effects of his wound. He was reported as sick in Boston just before his death and may have died there. His widow, Ruth, petitioned the General Court in 1676 and was awarded 10 li in money.
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[NI357] She may have been the daughter of Edward Woos, whose wife died in Charlestown August 20, 1642.
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[NI366] He came to New England with Rev. Joseph Hull and his Company who settled at Weymouth Ma in 1635; the shipping list gives John age 35, Elizabeth 32, Sarah (prob. a sister) 26, John 7, nathaniel 5, Elizabeth 3. He was made a Freeman at Weymouth September 2, 1635, where he was allotted 30 acres of land. He was representative at the General Court in 1637, 1638, 1639 for Weymouth; in 1642, he was one to obtain from the Indians a title to the Weymouth lands; he served as selectman in 1643, 1645, 1646, 1647, removed to Malden between 1648 and 1650 where he was selectman 1651, 1653, 1655; was appointed to Commissioner to and small causes (local Judge) 1657, 1659, 1661, 1662; appraiser in taking inventories of estates 1657, 1658, 1660, 1661, 1666, 1672, 1674; executor of estate of Richard Web in 1659 and became guardian of his son. He was among those who were fined for choosing their own minister without consulting neighboring churches; moderator of town meeting 1678-1680.

It is supposed that the son John above was lost at sea on a voyage to the Barbadoes and that the adopted son John was the John Upham who was brought from the Barbadoes, fatherless, at the age of four years, who was reared by Joh, Sr. and who was a soldier in the Indian War. He died November 27, 1677 at the age of 30 years.
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[NI369] One of the Hull Company
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[NI381] He resided at Menetomy.
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[NI391] Baptized August 10, 1718
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[NI392] Baptized October 15, 1721
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[NI393] Baptized February 9, 1723
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[NI394] Baptized May 5, 1728
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[NI395] Baptized August 22, 1731
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[NI396] He was a carpenter by trade and lived at Menotomy (Paige, History of Cambridge).
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[NI398] Baptized January 8, 1664
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[NI399] Baptized February 1, 1656
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[NI412] He was a carpenter.
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[NI446] Intention March 22, 1745/46
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[NI452] He graduated at Harvard College in 1689, the first of the Chebacco lads to a degree in arts and began preaching at Manchester the same year where he also taught school. In 1697, he was in Enfield, Hampshire County; about 1700 removed to Stow where he served the church 17 years; then taught school at Arundel, ME. and Chaplain at Fort William, preached half-time at Biddeford for ten or eleven years, then the people of Kittery and Ekiot built a chapel at Spruce Creek near the dividing line where he served for five years and was buried near the Meeting House there.
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[NI459] Possibly died at age 107.

Joseph Eveleth is said to have been in Boston in 1640 when he was 1 3/4 years old but hs father, with whom he must have been, is stated as being in Boston in 1642, but both of these may be correct. He was with the family in Gloucester, MA in 1646 and removed to Chebacco about 1673. He was a juror in the Witch Trials in 1692 "a man of sterling integrity who feared neither man nor the devel" and was of those who greatly regretted having had to take any part in the diteh delusion. The Boston evening Post, dated December 16, 1745 has the item: "On the 2d instant died at Ipswich Mr. Joseph Eveleth in the hundred and seventh year of his age. He left several children of a great age, one of whom is upward of seventy years old.
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[NI472] He is recorded as being in Boston in 1642 living in what is now Chelsea and owning land in East Boston, his occupation being that of "baker". He removed to Gloucester in 1646, but continued to pay taxes in Boston until 1688. In Gloucester he located on the bank of Little River near Annisquam, where he kept a public house; selectman in 1647; freeman in 1652; deputy to the General Cout in 1673 and released from ordinary training in that year on the condition that he pay 2 bushels of maize yearly to the company. The Essex Court Files show that in 1649 he was ordered to make public confessionf or "defaming the church at Gloucester; in 1652 he was sworn in as constable; on the Grand jury 1653, 1662, 1663, 1666; in 1656, was fined for failure to carry the votes of the freemen of Gloucester to the shire town. The following year was appointed Commissioner (local judge) for Gloucester; 1660 he signed with 26 others a testimonial of the good characterof John Jackson; 1663 was a witness in court regarding a defective highway; in 1667, special mention is made of the renewal of his license, he giving his oath to abide by the order of the General Court that there must be 4 bushels of malt to one hogshead of beere, and this license was repeated in 1668, 1669, 1670.
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[NI487] He took oath of fidelity in 1652; removed with his father to Cambridge Farms (now Lexington) and inherited the homestead.
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[NI503] He probably came in the fleet with Wnthrop in 1630 and requested to be admitted as a freeman in October of that year. Paige (History of Cambridge) says that he was a proprietor in Cambridge February 4, 1636/37 then inhabiting at Watertown and removed to Cambridge Farms about 1650. His will dated October 21, 1679 mentions sons Francis and Nathaniel, Daughter Dorcas Marsh and her children Nathan and Benjamin, and grandaughter Hannah Turner, probably daughter of the second Joanna (Savage).
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[NI505] Buried March 10, 1639
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[NI506] Buried November 20, 1638
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[NI516] He was Captain of militia. Selectman in 1637 and often afterwards, Town Clerk 1648 and for many years afterward which shows that he was a man of some education. Representative at General Court in 1651, 1653, 1663.
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[NI527] William Palmer was in Watertown as early as 1632 at Newbury MA in 1637 and one of the first settlers of Hampton, NH in 1638. Freeman at Hampton March 13, 1639; his house was between the lots of William Eastow and John Moulton, about the present site of the "Leavitt House" (1893). about 1650, he agreed to release to his son-in-law, John Sherman of Watertown, certain land in Great Ormsby, England and this transaction establisheds his English connection with Great Ormsby and also the fact that his daughter married Captain John Sherman.
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[NI528] The will of Grace Porter" no clear proof that she was the widow of Roger Porter" mentions two children, Elizabeth, wife of Daniel Smith and martha wife of Capt. John Sherman which gave rise to the error that martha was the daughter of Roger and Grace Porter.

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[NI531] Had a grant of land in Hampton, NH. on Exeter Road.
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[NI548] He was called "Lord Punkatassett" and lived ona lot that was bought by his father of Rev. Peter bulkeley and has been held in the family down to recent years. Freeman in 1690.
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[NI558] Died at the Castle a soldier there.
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[NI559] He came from Yorkshire England was in Concord in 1635/36-1640. Freeman there 1641. Estate inventoried at 596 li.
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[NI567] Husband is possibly also cousin.
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[NI570] He was Town Clerk in Concord and served in the narragansett Campaign, being wounded in the Swamp Fight. His son Ephraim drew the lot at Templeton for his Father's service in Capt. Davenport's company. His home wasin the North Quarter of Concord beyond the Concord River on what has been know as the "Edwin S. Barrett Place."
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[NI571] There is some question as to the parentage of this Ruth Wheeler in as much as Obadiah Wheeler, explicityly states in his will that has only one daughter, Susanna; but, the Concord Records give Ruth Wheeler, daughter of Obadiah (no mother stated) as born as above.
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[NI572] Drew lot #8 Narragansett Township #6 Templeton, MA
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[NI574] He was an original proprietor at Sudbury, MA in 1647 but was in Concord in the year following.
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[NI581] He was in Sudbury, MA as early as 1638 or 1639 an dhe apparently did not come to New England in the ship "Confidence" which left Southampton, England on April 24, 1638, a number of whose passengers went immediately to Sudbury. His grant of land was lot #38 and was located in that part of Sudbury which is now Maynard. A Record of a Town Meeting dated January 4, 1657, refers to a pond "lying in the 3d and 2d squadron" which necessitated a change in the road running north and south and it was ordered that this road was to run around the west end of the pond throught the land of John Toll an dSolomon Johnson, was to be 12 rods wide at the narrowest and John Toll and Solomon Johnson were to be allowed for the land taken away from them.

The name in the Sudbury records is in different spellings, but mainly is found "Toll" while the concord records have only the one record of Nehemia Hunt and Mary Tooll in which this family name is found. the family name of his wife Katherine is not known, but he was probably married after he came to New England.
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[NI589] He was one of the original proprietors of Concord, MA where he was Freeman in 1641 and owned considerable property, living for a time in the East quarter of the town. His will states that God has given him six children, five sons and one daughter. Joshua is named the first "Bourne", Samuel the second son, then are named Obadiah, John, Josiah who is called "youngest son" and daughter Susanna. It remains a problem why Ruth is not named. The will does ot seem to follow the usual order of age in naming the children.
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[NI597] Killed by Indians at Sudbury.
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[NI598] He lived in Charlestown and Malden, being for a time at Mystic Side; i.e. on the Mystic River side of Charlestown. He was a mariner and perhaps died at sea. His widow was granted administration on his estate on August 15, 1660. Wyman (Genealogies and Estates of Charlestown) refers to deeds which mention "Father Richard Dexter in 1667/68 and 1678.
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[NI611] The records seem to be scanty concerning him. He had a grant of land in Weymouth on the backside of Kingoak Hill between 1642 and 1644. He was made a freeman September 7, 1639.
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[NI617] He was in Boston MA February 28, 1642 when he was admitted as a townsman (voter in town affairs) in Charlestown in 1644 on Mystic side, where he had an estate that remained in the hand os his descendants through five generations.
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[NI623] He was brought to Charlestown, MA by his father in 1638 and accompanied his father to New Haven in that same year; graduated at Harvard College in 1651, later was a tutor there. Studied theology and becamje pastor of the church at Malden in 1656, while working on the farm at New Haven, he strained his back and never enjoyed good health after that. In 1684 he was offered the presidency of Harvard College, but declined the honor on account of his health. For many years he was compelled to have a colleague in his pastoral work; took long vacations seeking restoration to health; he was accounted skilful in medicine and practiced to the benefit of many. He is best known as the author of a remarkable poam "The Day of Doom", published in 1662, and popular in New England for a long period. The 6th edition appearing in 1715 and two editions being published in England. "The savage Calvinism of the poam is unsurpasse din literature save perhaps in Jonathan Edwards' sermon "Sinners in the hand sof an agnry god" but the work contains not a little dramatic force and here and there passages of dignity and beauty. "(Americana) "A poem which preserves as in amber, the ideas of his tiem and school." (Schaff-Herzog) he also wrote "God's controversy with New England" and Meat out of the Eater" in verse.
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[NI626] Thomas Mudge probably came from Devonshire, England. He and his wife were witnesses in the Middlesex Court in a case of assault on October 6, 1657 and again December 28, 1658. The latter being a case of assault of a servant upon his master, in which he gives his age as about 40 years and Marie ? his wife as about 30 ears. He was again a witness in 1668.
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[NI642] He came to Boston in 1638. His will names only the two children above and wife Esther. The inventory of his estate amounted to 401 li, 14 s, 2 d.
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[NI644] Baptized December 13, 1640
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[NI648] Killed at Blood Brook.
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[NI651] Died about 1675, probably in service
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[NI659] He joined the church on March 30, 1640. Was made Freeman on May 13 following and his wife Ruth joined a few days later. The inventory of his estate was taken by Robert Long, William Brackenbury and Richard Russell on the 4th day 10th month 1642. It mentions house and garden worth 20 poiunds and 2 acres of planting ground.
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[NI661] Baptized May 30, 1641
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[NI694] Edward Bragg is mentioned, December 30, 1642 as a servant of Mr. Symonds, which means that he came over having his expenses paid by Mr. Symonds, or upon an agreement to work for him. He gave a day's work carting voluntarily, besides his rate, toward the building of the cart bridge, November 19, 1646, which, perhaps, indicates that he had paid off his debt to Mr. Symonds. he was a commoner in 1664 and a voter in town affairs in 1679. He purchased a house lot on February 28, 1643, and perhaps, he had freed himself from debt to Mr. Symonds at that time. With Thomas Low, he bought 20 acres of land upon Mill Brook October 6, 1647; in November 1673, he was under bonds to keep the town from any charge by his entertaining Robert Starkweather and his family. On December 15, 1679, he was elected one of 24 ththing men. January 16, 1700 a seat at the Table in the new Meeting House was assigned to "Old Good'n Bragg." he served on the Jury in 1654 and 1671; on the Grand Jury in 1656, 1659, 1664, 1666, 1667; was granted administration on estate of John Wright, late of Newbury December 30, 1658. He and his wife Elizabeth signed a petition regarding the good character of one of their neighbors in 1668. His wife died in 1691, May 27.

His will dated January 14, 1706 and proved August 23, 1708; it mentions wife Sarah and daughter Mary Eveleth, bequeaths to the children of Deborah Searle land and buildings in the town of Rowley, to the church of Christ at Ipswich "which I am a member of three pounds in money to be laid out in a piece of silver plate for ye use of said church forever." Among the communion service plate of the first church ipswich is a silver cup inscribed

A D's )
Gift to the Church at Ipswich,
E B's)

The A D being Andrew Diamond probably and the E B Edward Bragg probably.
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[NI702] In her trial as a witch she carred herself with great dignity and discretion and refused to be intimidated into foolish confessions, but said that God would not require her to confess that of which she was not guilty; when asked if she did not believe it possible that the devil might be working through, she admitted that it might be possible, but if so, she was not conscious of it and did not consent ot it. The depth of her affliction was reached when the judges put her two daughters on the witness stand, one ten and othe other only eight years old, who in their innocence and childish fear admitted that they were witches and said that their mother had taught them to be such. She was put into prison where she remained thirteen weeks, but in the general amnesty which freed so many, she was set free, but still legally liable to penalty. For 11 years, she lived as a convicted criminal and then the attainder was removed. In the spring following she named her son mmi Ruhama, which means God is still merciful to his people.
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[NI704] He came to New England with his father in the same ship with Nathaniel Rogers which wa snearly, if not quite, six months in the passage across the Atlantic, in 1636. Much has been written about his life and ministrial service, he was over 45 years pastor at Andover. He suffered much in the Witch Craft delusion of 1692, in his immediate family and as pastor of his people, and was also in grave danger of personal guilt, but his position was his protection.
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[NI726] He was first a resident of Watertown, MA where the records have the name "Betts", but in Sudbury it is Best or Beast and the name is spelled Best in his will. On July 25, 1636, he was granted lot #14 in the "Great Dividents" containing 20 acres; on February 28, 1636/37, he was granted 1 acre of Plowland, #4; on June 26, 1637 he was granted 1 acre in the remote or Westpine meadows; all in Watertown. He is listed among the original settlers of Sudbury in 1638. His will was dated June 21, 1654, in which he speaks of himself as "sicke in body" and gives his house and land in Sudbury..."commons meadows wood to his two nephews Samuel and Nehemia Hunt to be equally divided between them, provdided that if either of them died without issue, the portion of the deceased should be divided between the rest of the children of William Hunt of Concord....the rest of my Goodes, whether money or cattle or graine now growing upon the gorund or lying in the barne now to be threshed, with bedding pewter brasse or w'ever else I give to the fiv echildren of my Cousin Hunt, only I will that my Red Heiffer and little calfe shal p'sently upon my death belong to Isaacke Hunt the profit thereon to rturn to him only then he shall have so much lesse of the other goodes as these two (the Heiffer an dye calfe) are now worth. And whereas I have three guns I give them to the three sons of William Hunt aforesaid, and my bible I give to my Cousin Samuel Hunt. I give two silver spoones to Elizabeth and Hannah Hunt to each of them one. I give also to Mr. Buckley of Concord and to Mr. Browne of Sudbury to each of them a potle of wine and to goodwife Meaner of Sudbury 2 shillings 6 pence and to her sonne Jn 18 pence and to her daughter 12 pence. I appoint my cousin Samuel Hunt my only executor. dated 21 June 1654 and signed with his mark. Witnesses were Peter Bulkely Tho: Bateman Nehemia Hunt.

The inventory was taken July 12, 1655 by Timothy Wheeler, Tho: Battman, Edmunds Goodnow, Richard Rice and Hugh Griffin and amounted to 3 score and 9 pounds 10 s 6d; mention is made of house and land in Sudbury appraised at 30 pounds.
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[NI740] Widow of George Abbott
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[NI745] Twin of Steven
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[NI746] Twin of John
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[NI751] Killed by the breaking of a bridge at Lynn MA
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[NI763] He came with his father about 1642 and lived in Rowley for about fourteen years. In 1655, he settled in Andover, MA where is called Husbandman and also Tailor. Here through industry he became financially well off and at one time was considered to be one of the five wealthiest men in Andover. He was a member of Sergt. James Osgood's military in 1658, or the town's company commanded by Osgood. He was made a freeman May 19, 1669. was elected constable in 1680 for the North End of the town. For 30 years or so, he had the care of the Meeting house, was granted the use of part of the parsonalge lands for repariing the Meeting House, mending "ye pulpit cushions and to get ye meeting house lock mended," was awarded in 1675 30 shillings "for sweeping ye meeting house and ringling ye bell." June 1, 1676 he bought 9 acres of upland "for which he is to pay 9 li in sweeping ye meeting hours and ringing the bell at 30s per annum," in 1679/80, he called "drummer" and is to ring the bell at 9 o'clock at night, also to "give ntocie by ye towling ofye bell everynight ye day of the month." In dht division of his estate, portions were allotted to the widow, George "eldest son", John "second son" Nehemia "third son" and daughters Sarah, Mary, Hanna, Lydia, son Samuel and daughter Mehitable, last two minors dated January 20, 1689/90
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[NI778] He came to New England with the Rev. Ezekial Rogers, landing at Salem in the fall of 1638. There were 20 families in the grou, many of whom had been "clothiers" in England. They located at Rowley and "were the first to manufacture cloth in the western world." I the allotment of house-lots, George Abbott headed the list of 59 and was granted 2 acres. The inventory of his estated amounted to 96li 2s 8d. He had the two sons who were distinguished as Thomas, Sr. and Thomas, Jr., but why is not clear.
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[NI784] He sailed from Southampton, England on April 6, 1635 in the brig "James" and after a voyage of 58 days, landed in Boston June 3, 1635. He gave his age as 32 years his wife Alice 28 years, children Mary 7, Thomas 4, Ralph 2.

the Andover Townsman says that he was a "barber surgeon" somewhat skilled in the shaving of beards, letting blood (perhaps the two go together, or did at that time) drawing teeth and in surgery necessary in the care of gun shot wounds, mainly by bandaging and in amputation with someslight knowledge of anatomy, that took up land in Ipswich in 1639, but it is supposed that he rented his farm to George Palmer and went to Boston where he probably came to his end."
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[NI790] He was at Ipswich in 1638 and in a list of the passengers on the shipe "Confidence" from Southampton is a Sarah Osgood of Hewell(wherwell) "spinster" and four children under 11, which may be the wife of John Osgood, who may have come at another time. He went to Newbury, whree, perhaps he was living when made freeman May 23, 1639, but was in Andover among the very fist group of settlers, where he was onf of the founders of the church; naturally, the ministers name stands first in the list, but John Osgoods comes next, or first among the lyament and Edmund Faulkner was the tenth in the list. The church was organized in October 1645. John Osgood was the first representative sent from Andover to the general cout. It seems that he was one of the petitioners for a settlement at Hampton, NH in 1638, but he decided to settle at Andover

It appears also that he was a man of some prominence in England before he came to New Englans, as a letter written by Dr. Stanley, headmaster of the famous school at Winchester, England refers to the intention of John Osgood to go to New England and requests the good officers of mr. Nicolas one of the Clerks of Counsel in King st. Westminister in securing a "passe" for him, as Jhn Osgood feared some obstacle might be put in his way of making the voyage. There may be a clue here as to why his name does not appear on the shipping list. The letter was dated March 23, 1637 and was endorsed the 3d of april following. (State Paper Office, London)
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[NI802] He left a widow Joan; youngest daughter Dorcas, Mary, son Robert, Stepehn who made executor of the will. Mentions Edward Abbott and his wife Elizabeth and John Bartlett , possible a son in law; and among the debtors to the estate is John Osgood. Probably the son who had had his portion of the estate. The will states that he was a Cottingworth in the parish of Wherwell, Cotting worht is a large farm of about 360 acres which formerly belonged to the Osgood amily and the ancient residence was stanging as late as 1866.

The father, Peter, left a widow Elizabeth and sons Robert, Richard, John and Peter all under age in 1586, also daughters Margaret and Elizabeth.
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[NI869] Twin of Ronald
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[NI870] Twin of Robert
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[NI900] Baptized June 27, 1697 in Watertown, MA
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[NF023] Re-Married on Government Request on August 30, 1968 or 1969
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[NF044] Intention Feb. 10, 1822 (Harvard p. 167)
Acton pps 162,167
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[NF145] Intention July 2, 1737
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